3 Steps to delivering an engaging group presentation!

3 Steps to delivering an engaging group presentation!
 

In our first blog on group presentations, we talked about the benefits of holding them, and today we look at the steps you can take to ensure you run an engaging session!

Regardless of the product, service or topic of discussion, there are some key considerations presenters should consider to maximise engagement.

It’s worth remembering that although you might like to think otherwise, the audience may not always be attending a presentation for the sheer thrill of hearing about the topics set out in the agenda. It may be a company requirement/recommendation, to collect CPD credits, or just for some time away from work.

This only emphasises the importance of ensuring a positive experience.

1. Put yourself and the audience at ease

Regardless of how many times you’ve spoken in front of people, it would be false to claim you don’t still get a bit nervous beforehand. A good way to settle the nerves is to have a chat to people as the room begins to fill up. Try to avoid anything related to the presentation and focus on asking them questions…
“How’s your day going?”… “How long have you worked for the company?” …“Where’s good to go for lunch around here?”… “You must be either extremely bored or just very keen to get some time away from work to come and listen to me talk for an hour!”

Not only does this settle your nerves but it prompts immediate engagement from the audience outside the pressure of the presentation, but most importantly, it gives you the opportunity to showcase your personality. It's a fact that if people like you, they will be more likely to pay attention to what you’re saying.

2. The fun doesn’t end here

Just because you’ve had some good conversations and maybe even got a few laughs before the start of the presentation, you could still lose the interest of the audience if you slip into ‘robot mode’ once you start talking business. By this I mean, a monotone voice, scripted bullet point delivery, lack of movement etc.

- Try to keep an enthusiasm in your voice or the audience will become as disinterested as you sound

- Be familiar and confident with your content, long pauses and ‘errms’ can give the impression you don’t know your stuff

- Use relatable examples, once you’ve made a point, think of a way to put this into a real-life scenario

- The most vital part of maintaining the focus of an audience is to ask them questions, make a point and ask for their opinion, or check their existing knowledge by asking a question on the upcoming topic.

3. Drawing to a close

The end of the presentation is your last point of contact with the audience. Hopefully, they’ve enjoyed the content and shown engagement throughout. What’s important now is to provide them with the tools to contact you;

- Make sure your last slide contains the company name and logo, your name, a contact number and an email address. Whilst some people may note this down it's not 100% effective.

- A more direct way of providing the audience with your details is to leave business cards or flyers at the end of each row, or on the seats before the presentation.

- Draw their attention to the above, it’s important to finish with a closing statement highlighting your contact information and to get in touch if they’ve benefitted from the presentation